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Tag Archives: Rebuilt Tranny Jazz

Jingle Bell Jazz Duke Ellington Miles Davis Herbie Hancock Christmas

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FLAC

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Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

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Tracklist

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A1     Duke Ellington –     Jingle Bells

Recorded in NYC, June 21, 1962

Bass – Aaron Bell
Producer – Teo Macero
Reeds – Harry Carney, Jimmy Hamilton, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Russell Procope
Written-By – M. Ellington*
Drums – Sam Woodyard
Trombone – Britt Woodman, Chuck Connors, Lawrence Brown
Piano – Billy Strayhorn
Trumpet – Bill Berry, Cat Anderson, Ray Nance, Roy Burrows*

3:00

A2     Lionel Hampton –     White Christmas

Recorded in NYC, January 11, 1962

Bass – George Duvivier
Producer – Teo Macero
Vibraphone – Lionel Hampton
Written-By – I. Berlin*
Guitar – Billy Mackel
Drums – Osie Johnson
Trombone – Eddie Bert, Lou McGarity, Richard Hixson, Robert Byrne
Piano – Tommy Flanagan

2:31

A3     Chico Hamilton –     Winter Wonderland

Recorded In NYC, May 26, 1961

Bass – Buddy Catlett
Producer – Teo Macero
Drums – Chico Hamilton
Guitar – Harry W. Polk
Saxophone – Charles Lloyd
Cello – Nat Gershman*
Written-By – D. Smith*, F. Bernard*

5:23

A4     Carmen McRae –     The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting On An Open Fire)

Recorded in NYC, June 29, 1961

Producer – Teo Macero
Bass – Bob Cranshaw
Celesta – Norman Simmons
Written-By – M. Torme*, R. Wells*

3:54

A5     Pony Poindexter –     Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer

Recorded in NYC, May 10, 1962

Bass – Bill Yancy*
Producer – Teo Macero
Baritone Saxophone – Pepper Adams
Alto Saxophone – Gene Quill, Phil Woods
Tenor Saxophone – Billy Mitchell, Dexter Gordon
Alto Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone – Pony Poindexter
Drums – Charlie Persip
Piano – Gildo Mahones
Written-By – J. Marks*

2:31

A6     Paul Horn –     We Three Kings Of Orient Are

Recorded in Hollywood, CA, August 15, 1962

Bass – Victor Gaskin
Producer – Irving Townsend
Flute – Paul Horn
Vibraphone – Emil Richards
Written-By – J. Hopkins*
Drums – Milt Turner
Arranged By – Paul Horn
Piano – Paul Moer

3:50

B1     Dave Brubeck Quartet, The –     Santa Claus I Comin’ To Town

Recorded in NYC, June 2, 1961

Bass – Eugene Wright
Producer – Teo Macero
Written-By – H. Gillespie*, J. F. Coot*
Drums – Joe Morello
Piano – Dave Brubeck
Alto Saxophone – Paul Desmond

3:40

B2     Lambert, Hendricks & Ross –     Deck Us All With Boston Charlie

Recorded in NYC, May 4, 1961

Piano – Gildo Mahones
Producer – Teo Macero
Bass – Ike Isaacs (2)
Drums – Jimmy Wormworth
Written-By – N. Monath*, W. Kelly*

3:12

B3     Herbie Hancock –     Deck The Halls

Recorded in NYC, January 14, 1969

Bass – George Duvivier
Producer – Teo Macero
Vibraphone – Dave Carey
Guitar – Al Caiola
Trombone – Jimmy Cleveland
Saxophone – Frank Wess
Drums – Ed Shaughnessy
Arranged By – Jay Cee
Piano – Chick Corea, Herbie Hancock
Trumpet – Woody Shaw

4:59

B4     Manhattan Jazz All Stars, The –     If I Were A Bell

Recorded in NYC, October 19, 1959

Producer – Teo Macero
Vibraphone – Teddy Charles
Written-By – F. Loesser*
Guitar – Jimmy Raney
Saxophone – Teo Macero
Drums – Ed Shaughnessy
Piano – Dave McKenna
Trumpet – Addison Farmer, Nick Travis

2:54

B5     Marlowe Morris –     Rockin’ Around The Christmas Tree

Recorded in NYC, August 16, 1962

Producer – Frank Driggs
Organ – Marlowe Morris
Drums – Jo Jones, Ray Barretto
Written-By – J. Marks*

2:25

B6     Miles Davis –     Blue Xmas (To Whom It May Concern)

Recorded in NYC, August 21, 1962

Bass – Paul Chambers (3)
Producer – Teo Macero
Written-By – B. Dorough*, M. Davis*
Congas, Bongos – William Correa
Saxophone – Wayne Shorter
Drums – Jimmy Cobb
Trombone – Frank Rehak
Vocals – Bob Dorough
Trumpet – Miles Davis

2:40

The Big Daddy. The Head Honcho. The King Crooner of the Jazz World. This is the standard by which every other jazz album is measured. However, when Kind of Blue dropped in 1959 it was considered a new direction for the genre. The organic creation between the all-star cast departed from the rigid and technically complex compositions of the past. I’ll let Bill Evans, the main pianist from this album, give his take on Miles’ giant leap for jazzkind.

Improvisation in Jazz

By Bill Evans

There is a Japanese visual art in which the artist is forced to be spontaneous. He must paint on a thin stretched parchment with a special brush and black water paint in such a way that an unnatural or interrupted stroke will destroy the line or break through the parchment. Erasures or changes are impossible. These artists must practice a particular discipline, that of allowing the idea to express itself in communication with their hands in such a direct way that deliberation cannot interfere.

The resulting pictures lack the complex composition and textures of ordinary painting, but it is said that those who see will find something captured that escapes explanation. This conviction that direct deed is the most meaningful reflection, I believe, has prompted the evolution of the extremely severe and unique disciplines of the jazz or improvising musician.

Group improvisation is a further challenge. Aside from the weighty technical problem of collective coherent thinking, there is the very human, even social need for sympathy from all members to bend for the common result. This most difficult problem, I think, is beautifully met and solved on this recording.

As the painter needs his framework of parchment, the improvising musical group needs its framework in time. Miles Davis presents here frameworks which are exquisite in their simplicity and yet contain all that is necessary to stimulate performance with a sure reference to the primary conception.

Miles conceived these settings only hours before the recording dates and arrived with sketches which indicated to the group what was to be played. Therefore, you will hear something close to pure spontaneity in these performances. The group had never played these pieces prior to the recordings and I think without exception the first complete performance of each was a “take.”

Although it is not uncommon for a jazz musician to be expected to improvise on new material at a recording session, the character of these pieces represents a particular challenge.

Personnel:

  • Miles Davis, trumpet and leader
  • Julian Adderley, alto saxophone (Courtesy of Riverside Records)
  • John Coltrane (Legendary in his own right.), tenor saxophone
  • Wyn Kelly, piano (Courtesy of Riverside Records)
  • Bill Evans, piano
  • Paul Chambers, bass
  • James Cobb, drums

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Click here to download Kind of Blue to 320 kbps

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