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jethro tull songs from the wood vinyl flac

Click here for a random Rebuilt Tranny album post

Here’s the first of a foray into lossless FLAC conversion. Unlike previous 320 kbps conversions, nothing has been manipulated after the initial recording; no digital pop & click removal removal, no equalization, no nothing. If you’re lucky you might catch a spot where a piece of fuzz gets caught under the needle. It’s about as close to the actual vinyl as you’ll get.

Take a listen and make sure to post your comments. This album has a rich diversity of instruments, which should display FLAC’s increased musical capabilities. I hope you enjoy.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Let me bring you all things refined:

Galliards and lute songs served in chilling ale.

Greetings, well-met fellow, hail!

I am the wind to fill your sail.

I am the cross to take your nail:

A singer of these ageless times–

With kitchen prose, and gutter rhymes.

Part 3 USA Dub Remix

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This video features “The Look of Love (Part 1)”. Part 3 from Side B of this single is a very slight variation on this theme. The USA Dub Remix on Side B is totally weird. Enjoy.

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Click here to download the MP3 conversion from the 12″

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A The Look Of Love (USA Remix – Dub Version) 7:37
B The Look Of Love (Part 3 – Dance Version) 4:17

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In 1966, the same year the majority of these songs were recorded, the Sutro Baths in San Francisco burned to the ground. The Sutro Baths, built in 1897 on the Pacific Ocean shoreline, was a 3-acre collection of salt water pools, water slides, taxidermy exhibits, and curiosities from the world around. The main attraction was, as the name implies, the temperature-controlled salt water pools, which held up to 1.7 million gallons of water and 10,000 swimmers on any given day. The structure itself was a spiderweb of steel girders which supported over 100,000 window panes, allowing swimmers to enjoy sunlight while taking a climate-controlled dip. Surviving pictures of the Sutro Baths are both alluring and terrifying.

Sutro Baths 1897 San Francisco

I hope they had their tetanus shots. Oh wait, that wasn't invented yet. Bummer.

The Sutro Baths are even more horrifyingly awesome when you watch them on video, as is evidenced here in footage taken by Thomas Edison in 1897.

So why is any of this important? The artists in this band grew up in a time when places like the Sutro Baths still existed. They were surrounded by remnants of the European Industrial Revolution, be it the bridges they took across town or the musty warehouses in which they held band practice. I feel that the music contained on this album reflects this environmental influence at its core. However, it is not an ode to the manufactured trappings of the early 20th century but rather a full-throttle attempt to break free from its rigid sense of order and symmetry.

Yet I find it ironic that machines were necessary in order to rebel against their world; a world created by steam engines and diesel geargrinders. After all, electric guitars and amplifiers are nothing more than machines. Yes, they’re sound-producing machines, sound which is interpreted as art that in turn stirs the gamut of human emotion. But essentially they’re nothing more than wood, steel, and wires brought to life by a mysterious electric demon.

Furthermore, I have a gut feeling that these artists’ very simple machines had a direct role in the fire that burned Sutro Baths to the ground. It could very well be that every one of these bands was practicing at the same exact moment on June 26, 1966. With the overdriven amplifiers all running at once they could have sent a cataclysmic electric surge from Europe, past schools of dolphins under the Atlantic Ocean, past herds of cattle on the Great Plains, blew a few fuses in Hoover Dam during a detour, and into the water heaters at Sutro Baths, causing them to explode in a ghastly ball of fire.

Why would a power surge from Europe target one seemingly innocent bath house thousands of miles away and not instead, perhaps, something for the greater good like frying the USSR’s entire radar control system? First, it’s a well-known fact that every man, woman and child in Europe during the 60’s was a closet communist, so the previously mentioned scenario doesn’t hold water. Second, San Francisco’s a hot spot for European tourists. I can’t walk around on the weekends without seeing an Italian in a funny hat, a Pole wearing weird jeans with funny pocket stitching, or a group of Germans barking and hacking out what they call their native tongue.

When you think about it the answer is quite simple as to why these European rockers, and one Canadian, decided to destroy the Sutro Baths. Every one of them, throughout their childhood, visited the Sutro Baths on family holiday. They, being used to Europe’s nude beaches, didn’t pack swimsuits and were forced by Sutro Bath employees to rent one of their turn-of-the-century wool numbers. These, of course, were entirely itchy and unflattering.

swimsuit 1900s wool one-piece

Looking good. Not.

American swimmers, cocky as ever with their post-war short shorts and polka dot bikinis, harangued the European fashion misfits to no end. I mean, they really gave it to them. It didn’t end at calling them Soggy Bottom Bambinas or Frumpy Frogs. They kept it real by administering wet, woolly wedgies. I’m talking real ass-rippers here, folks. Blood and shit exploding everywhere in a frothy, briny foam–all set to a chorus of teenage American laughter. This is a trespass for which the Europeans never forgave the Americans and the site of their humiliation: Sutro Baths. Can you blame them?

I’m still gathering data from European energy conglomerates and PG&E before I bring my case before the International Court of Justice. As such, I must make the legal disclaimer that these opinions are most likely the truth and are probably not false. So kiss my ass, legal types.

What I can safely say is that these European garage rockers did succeed in kicking my ass with a six string blast. And then some.

>>>Click here to download Searching In The Wilderness on 320 kbps MP3 from vinyl

Artist and Track Breakdown (Preview vids at the bottom.)

Searching In The Wilderness Muziek Express Op Art '66 Serie

1. Namelosers – But I’m So Blue

Sweden’s Namelosers deliver a fine, aggressive folk-punker with “But I’m So Blue”, the B-Side of a very confused version of Rufus Thomas’ “Walking The Dog”. Propelled by a powerful rhythm track, with terrific harp, strong vocals, and a chaotic guitar break, this 1965 track captures the Namelosers evolution from a standard beat group into archetypical Euro-Punkers!

Searching In The Wilderness "Muziek Express"

A2. Red Squares – You Can Be My Baby

The Red Squares “You Can Be My Baby” stands as one of the most powerful and well produced Mod Ravers of the sixties, in a league with the best releases by the Birds, Eyes, Creation, or Small Faces. Transplanted Englishmen, the Red Squares enjoyed much greater success in Sandanavia than in their native England.

Slashing guitar chords open this 1967 release, with strong, melodic vocals and chorus leading into the wild, Pop-Art style rave-ups, the vocals sounding clearer and convincing as mayhem occurs on the instrumental front.

An alternate version of “You Can Be My Baby” was also released, this take being much slower, with a thin, sparse production, almost demo quality, lacking most of the power and excitement for this issue, which stands as one of the best Swedish records of the sixties!

Searching In The Wilderness muziek express

A3. Motions – For Another Man

Holland’s Motions are generally considered to be one of the finest European sixties bands, sort of continental Remains. Led by songwriter-guitarist-singer Rob Van Leeuwen, their reputation rests on a handful of singles and E.P. tracks, and one fabulous album, Introduction to The Motions, from which this track is taken. Their range of styles was impressive, from Beatles style uptempo ballads to the full-throttle pop auto-destruct of “Everything That’s Mine”, a 1966 non-L.P. single. “For Another Man” is a good example of their more melodic style, with punchy acoustic guitar, irresistible hooks, and great vocals.

Muziek Express Searching In The Wilderness

A4. Sean Buckley and The Breadcrumbs – Everybody Knows

This 1965 U.K. Release is distinguished by Shel Talmy’s solid production, and is highlighted by some startling guitar work by Jimmy Page. The song and band performance merely serve as a springboard for an electrifying guitar break, as exciting as any session playing Page is credited with in the 60’s. See the excellent James Patrick Page – Session Man double LP for further examples of  some of his most inspired work.

A5. The Boys Blue – You Got What I Want

The Boys Blue were an early incarnation of the Sorrows, and released this version in late 1965.

Muziek Express Searching In The Wilderness

Ferocious, mutated post R&B guitar mayhem characterizes the In Crowd’s monumental 1965 feedback and overload orgy of strangled guitars, howling vocals, wailing harp, a truly brutal rhythm attack, compression, leakage, demented 6-string axe murder, and the Parlophone kitchen sink, all combined into a sage witch’s brew of HELL RAISING FURY!

Steve Howe joined the In Crowd (the embryonic Tomorrow) in mid 1965, apparently in time to play guitar on this track.

“Things She Says” is certainly one of the greatest records of the entire R&B/Beat explosion, and is re-issued here for the first time ever. Roll over Beethoven, and tell Crawdaddy Simone the news!

Muziek Express Searching In The Wilderness

A7. Cherokees – Little Lover

“Little Lover” is a track off of The Cherokees scarce 2nd Australian LP, a rare example of the band favoring hard-driving, aggressively electric approach. Fuzzy guitar, upbeat vocals and an enthusiastic performance lead into a wild guitar break, perhaps offering future members of Radio Birdmen early inspiration.

A8. Outsiders – Won’t You Listen

How great are the Outsiders? One listen to this and one look at the cover photo should give you a good idea!. “Won’t You Listen” is off of the Outsiders absolutely outrageous first LP on the Dutch “Relax” label. Amphetamine guitar leads over a pace, changing tempo almost at random, with Wally Tax’s vocal and harp somehow keeping pace with the instrumental pandemonium.

Muziek Express Searching In The Wilderness

A9. Muswell Ravens – All Aboard

The Muswell Ravens entertain with this previously unissued 1965 studio recording. “All Aboard” is distinguished by sloppy, exciting guitar breaks and a drunken, leering vocal delivery. This track is straight ahead rock’n’roll oiled up by liberal applications of Nut-Brown Ale.

B1. A Passing Fancy – I’m Losing Tonight

Brutal Detroit-style electric guitar kicks off this Bo Diddlin’ pounder. “I’m Losing Tonight” is rivalled only by the MC-5’s “Looking at You” and the Underworld’s “Go Away” for sheer electric intensity and attack.

Hailing from Canada, A Passing Fancy released a crappy psychedelic styled album in 1967, including a truly awful version of this track. Fortunately, it was re-recorded for 45 release, and stands today as one of the best Canadian releases of the 60’s.

Muziek Express Searching In The Wilderness

B2. Outlaws – Keep A Knockin’

England’s Outlaws contribute a Scream Lord Sutch style version of “Keep A Knockin'”, a 1964 Joe Meek production, highlighted by a succession of stunning guitar breaks contributed by a teenage Ritchie Blackmore, heard here displaying the technique that made him, along with “Little” Jimmy Page and “Big” Jim Sullivan, one of London’s most in demand session guitarists during the period 1963-1966.

Muziek Express Searching In The Wilderness

B3. Q-65 – It Came To Me

Holland’s Q-65 released a large number of excellent 45 and LP tracks, and “It Came To Me” is certainly one of the best of them. The production is excellent, lending both the vocals and guitars a bright, clear sound full of bite and energy. Driven by an amazingly solid rhythm track, “It Came To Me” stands as a milestone of European Beat/R&B, and sounds just as exciting today as it did 45 years ago.

Muziek Express Searching In The Wilderness

B4. The Golden Earrings best ever performance was relegated to the B-side of their 1st single, and was has never been re-issued until now. “Chunk of Steel” is fabulous, a great song, lyrically intriguing and musically adventurous. Heavily Beatles influenced, the vocal interplay on this 1965 release is counterpointed by biting guitars, pounding drums, and a driving production.

Muziek Express Searching In The Wilderness

B5. Cuby and The Blizzards – I’m So Restless

A high energy rocker, “Restless” by Holland’s Cuby and The Blizzards, the B-side of their first single is a wild, guitar raving, mod flavored Euro-beat blast off!

Muziek Express Searching In The Wilderness

B6. Snobs – Heartbreak Hotel

The ridiculous outfits the snobs popularized do nothing to detract from their spirited approach to raving-up anything from “Buckle Shoe Stomp” to “Heartbreak Hotel”. Enjoying most of their admittedly limited success in Sweden, this 1965 released features and awesome live, wild sound. A video performance on the “Red Skelton” TV show in late 1964 has reportedly survived, rekindling Snob-mania amongst those already in the know. One could hardly do worse than to join them.

B7.The Buzz – You’re Holding Me Down

Having previously done business as the Boston Dexters, who released a strong single with “Nothing’s Gonna Change Me” In 1965, England’s The Buzz hooked up with eccentric producer Joe Meek in 1966 to record this, their sole 45. The full range of Meek’s studio genius is displayed on this recording, with highly compressed vocals being blasted by staccato bursts of machine gun guitar, all drowning in a cesspool of echo and feedback. This release stands as one of Joe Meeks finest: wild, adventurous, no holds barred experimental rave-up.

B8. Alan Pounds Gets Rick – Searching In The Wilderness

OUT-FUCKIN’-RAGEOUS!

 

I’d sworn off Ska for the rest of my life…until I listened to this record.

Flashback to 2002

The memory of when Ska went on my permanent shit list is still very vivid. During college a friend had invited me to a Reel Big Fish concert at Bogart’s. I told him I’d have to think about it because of one major factor: Bogart’s is easily one of the worst venues of past, present or future. Its bouncers are usually current or former members of a lame straight edge “gang” named, laughably, Courage Crew. The members are composed of nerdy dudes who found themselves bullied incessantly throughout high school and, as a result of their endless wedgies, joined a “gang” after graduating or dropping out to feel tough.

I use the term gang with quotations because the terms team, organization or club can’t be used to describe a bunch of dudes who roll 20 deep and pick fights with a single guy because he and one of their slut girlfriends used to neck behind Lee’s Famous Recipe Chicken in Covington. And they aren’t into cooking meth, trickin’ hoes, doing anything illegally profitable, so the unquotationed term gang really isn’t appropriate either. Until I find a good descriptor for their douchey little group the quotations will have to do.

ANYWAY, I didn’t want to see Reel Big Fish in the first place and especially didn’t want to get hassled by oily sXe dudes at the shit stain that is 2621 Short Vine. However, the the tickets were free, it was my friend’s birthday and he’s a pretty swell guy so I sucked it up and boarded the Oi Oi Express.

Big mistake. Throughout Junior High and High School I’d surfed the Ska tsunami that engulfed teenage America in the mid 90s. I was listening to it all: The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Operation Ivy, The Voodoo Glow Skulls, The Aquabats, Hepcat, and whatever bands were on the endless Ska compilations I bought at Best Buy. However, I never attended a single Ska concert because my Mormon parents prohibited any social activities within Cincinnati city limits, or as the Mormon bishop called it, Strumpetville. If I’d seen the terrible spectacle of live Ska at an early age I would have ceased and desisted wasting my parent’s money on Ska box sets much, much earlier.

Ok, I’ve never admitted this, even to my therapist, so I’m going to come right out and say it. I had to endure 2 hours of unadulterated and unyielding skanking at that Reel Big Fish Concert. It was much like the following video, except it was scrawny white dudes instead of Hispanic folks. And it was really dark and damp. And I was crying.

Round and round they went. And round. And round. And after a while the spinning rude boys, paired with the nauseating trumpet which spewed from Bogart’s shitty PA, made a brother wanna hurl. So, in knee-jerk fashion, I ran outside to avoid soiling the dance floor. Once outside I unleashed my vomitous fury upon the adjacent storefront of the long-abandoned Jupiter And Beyond Arcade. It was at this moment I swore, much as I did with Goldschläger after a particularly debauched Halloween, that I would never ingest Ska again so long as I lived.

Fast forward to Present Day

Last week I was down at Mole’s Record Exchange in Clifton perusing their small but sweet collection of used vinyl. I happened upon The English Beat’s Special Beat Service and remembered I was quite fond of one of their songs, “Save It For Later”. Sure enough it was on this album, so I picked it up and brought it home for a listen.

What the rest of the disc contained was a delightfully British form of early Ska. They even use an accordion…and it makes so much sense it hurts. It also includes a song from the Ferris Bueller’s Day Off soundtrack. The part you’re most likely to recognize starts at 2:16.

Last week I would have said that under no circumstances would I be listening to Ska in 2011 (with the exception of Hepcat, because Hepcat owns). But this album is telling me that 2011 is brimming with of all sorts of pleasant surprises. So, stay tuned with an open mind for tons of great music to come at Rebuilt Tranny’s Rat Rod Record Exchange.

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>>>Click here to download Special Beat Service at 320 kbps

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Tracklist

A1 I Confess 4:33
A2 Jeanette 2:48
A3 Sorry 2:33
A4 Sole Salvation 3:07
A5 Spar Wid Me 4:32
A6 Rotating Head 3:26
B1 Save It For Later 3:36
B2 She’s Going 2:11
B3 Pato And Roger A Go Talk 3:20
B4 Sugar & Stress 2:57
B5 End Of The Party 3:33
B6 Ackee 1 2 3 3:13

Update 1/4/11: Gerry Rafferty died today at the age of 63. He passed on peacefully at home with family. Thanks for the music, Gerry.

If you’re not familiar with Gerry Rafferty or with his song “Baker Street” you should first take a look-see at this video.

Please, allow your saxophone-induced erection to subside before reading the remainder of this post.

While researching this album I came across a couple of interesting pieces of information about Gerry Rafferty. First, Rafferty just recently suffered liver failure due to acute alcoholism and is in critical condition. Amazingly this isn’t the first time he’s suffered liver failure from overindulgence. Additionally, alcoholism has driven Rafferty to a life of seclusion; and perhaps made him a fan of George Thorogood. There have even been reports of him completely disappearing from time to time. All of this leads one to believe that, despite becoming a popular musician and selling over 5.5 million copies of City To City, Rafferty’s a lonely, depressed soul. Evidence of this is found in the lyrics of “Baker Street”.

Winding your way down on Baker Street
Light in your head, and dead on your feet
Well another crazy day
You drink the night away
And forget about everything
This city desert makes you feel so cold,
Its got so many people but its got no soul
And it’s taken you so long to find out you were wrong
When you thought it held everything

Baker Street, London, England

You used to think that it was so easy
You used to say that it was so easy
But you’re tryin’, you’re tryin’ now
Another year and then you’d be happy
Just one more year and then you’d be happy
But you’re cryin’, you’re cryin’ now

Second, some people credit the sexophone solo in “Baker Street” with inciting the stampede of screaming reeds that ran rampant throughout 80’s pop. Music critic and historian Richard Ingham termed Rafferty’s sax influence the “Baker Street Phenomenon” in The Cambridge Companion To The Saxophone. Below is an excerpt from the book:

The year 1978 saw the appearance of what can only be described as the Baker Street phenomenon. An attractive but seemingly innocuous rock ballad, a hit for singer/composer Gerry Rafferty, was decorated by a handful of notes turned into an eight-bar phrase at the beginning and between verses.

No one really knows why, but following the success (and consequent air-play) of this number, it seemed that every self-respecting band had to include a saxophone.

Soon after that an enormous percentage of TV advertisements had a sultry tenor or wailing alto taking prominence, and in the mid 1980s the saxophone became the most popular instrument for youngsters starting out. Rafael Ravenscroft, the player in question, can thus be said to have initiated the biggest boom in saxophone sales since the craze of the 1920s.

This [testifies] to the power of the mass media, as well as the music itself, and follows in a direct line Acker Bilk, whose Stranger on the Shore was responsible for a generation of clarinet players, and later James Galway with Annie’s Song, similarly providing flute players.

It seemed that Baker Street legitimised (sic) the saxophone in mainstream pop, instead of being an extra instrument on loan from jazz. Almost the best part of this whole story is the fact, like many inventions, it appeared quite by chance.

The band were recording the number, and Rafael Ravenscroft was booked to do a session on soprano (heard briefly in the introduction). Having completed this, they were still waiting for the guitarist to arrive, who was due to record the now famous opening phrases. Time passed and Ravenscroft mentioned that he had an alto in the car if that would do as a substitute for the guitar. It was found to be satisfactory.

It’s hard to imagine the 80s without all the gratuitous sax. Hard, but somewhat cathartic. Here’s a good list of the best of the worst saxual songs from the cocaine decade.

Finally, Gerry Rafferty is a total hipster.

Beard...check. Big glasses...check. Forlorn stare into nothingness...check. Systems check complete: Hipster is a go.

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>>>Click here to download City To City at 320 KBPS

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Tracklist

1 The Ark 5:40
Electric Guitar – Jerry Donahue
Fiddle, Mandolin – Graham*
Vocals [Intro] – Bashwhackers, The
2 Baker Street 6:08
Lead Guitar [Lead Electric] – Hugh*
Rhythm Guitar [Rhythm Electric] – Nigel Jenkins
Saxophone – Raphael Ravenscroft
Synthesizer [Moog] – Tommy*
3 Right Down The Line 4:28
4 City To City 5:03
Acoustic Guitar [Acoustic] – Gerry*
Backing Vocals – Gary Taylor (4) , John McBurnie , Rab Noakes , Roger Brown (3) , Vivian McAuliff*
Fiddle – Graham*
Harmonica – Paul Jones
Tambourine – Hugh Murphy
5 Stealin’ Time 5:57
Acoustic Guitar [Acoustics] – Gerry* , Micky Moody
Grand Piano, Synthesizer [Moggs] – Tommy*
Steel Guitar – Brian Cole*
Synthesizer [String Machine] – Graham*
6 Mattie’s Rag 3:29
Accordion – Woody*
Resonator Guitar [Dobro] – Brian*
Synthesizer [String Machine], Fiddle, Arranged By [Brass Section Arranged By] – Graham*
7 Whatever’s Written In Your Heart 6:36
Backing Vocals – Joanna Carlin
8 Home And Dry 4:56
Lead Guitar – Nigel*
9 Island 5:14
Accordion – Willy Ray
Drums – Glen Le Fleur*
Saxophone [Sax] – Raphael*
10 Waiting For The Day 5:45
Bass – Gary Taylor (4)
Drums – Henry Spinnetti*
Electric Guitar [Electric Rhythm] – Andy Fairweather-Low
Electric Piano, Organ, Arranged By [Bass Arrangements] – Tommy Eyre
Fiddle – Graham Preskett
Lead Guitar, Rhythm Guitar – Hugh Burns
Percussion – Glen Le Fleur*
Piano, Vocals – Gerry Rafferty